Change Your World-NOT your Body

Monday, July 21, 2014

Transition-Hysterectomy and the Dangers of Laparoscopy using Power Morcellators

I was recently ask by a member of the American Recall Center to bring to the attention of my primary female readership the dangers of the Power Morcellator

From the website:

What is a Power Morcellator? A device used in hysterectomies to cut tissue into small pieces to be removed from the body. However, uterine cancers sometimes go undetected prior to the procedure. In these cases, the morcellator dices up and spreads unsuspected cancer inside the woman's body.

  • Hysterectomy is the 2nd most common surgery among women in the United States

  • By age 70, one out of three American women will have had a hysterectomy

  • 90% of these surgeries are done to remove Fibroids (non-cancerous tumors found in the uterus)

  • The average life span following accidental morcellation of sarcoma is only 24-36 months

  • Only 15% of women who have leiomyosarcoma (LMS) that has spread (stage 4) will be alive after 5 years

  • Women with sarcoma who are morcellated are about 4 times more likely to die from sarcoma than if they had not been morcellated.

Females seeking hysto's post testosterone use (heightening cancer risks to reproductive organs) should be keenly aware of power morcellator's potentially being used in their surgery. In trans female hysto's trans females are not generally tested for reproductive cancers since their hysto is considered elective. If cancer is present regardless of cause, and a full hysterectomy is performed (and it usually is) with laparoscopy using PM's, fragments of cancerous organ/s can be spread to various other internal organs. By the time trans females becomes aware of these cancers, their potential lifespan shrinks drastically to less than a handful of years IF they initially survive.. 
IF GETTING A HYSTO PLEASE READ FINE PRINT AND ASK YOUR DOCTORS LOTS OF QUESTIONS ABOUT POWER MORCELATOR USE IN YOUR PROCEDURE.
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7 comments:

  1. I'll never forgive you for all the people in my community (and yours) who have fallen victim to an oppressive trans narrative, and accompanying medical processes (including myself) and who will never take your warnings seriously (or even read them) because of vile way you have disowned us and turned us away, leaving us nowhere to run but to the arms of an oppressive, neo-libralist, trans paradigm constructed and run by dominant men.

    -A young Butch

    ReplyDelete
  2. YB,

    Is this a quote from somewhere? Or merely a mistake as to where you posted?

    dirt

    ReplyDelete
  3. Neither, this is a message to you from me dear sister.

    ReplyDelete
  4. PCOS can be an issue with FTMs who have been on testosterone for years and still have their ovaries and uterus.

    PCOS and ovarian and endometrial cancers

    "Some physicians recommend hysterectomy (surgical removal of the uterus) and oophorectomy (surgical removal of the ovaries) within the first 5 years of starting testosterone therapy. This is because there is some concern that long-term testosterone treatment may cause the ovaries to develop similar symptoms as those seen in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). PCOS has been linked to increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia (a condition that occurs when the lining of the uterus (endometrium) grows too much) and thus endometrial cancer, as well as ovarian cancer.
    It should be noted that it is difficult to know whether the risk for such cancers is increased by testosterone therapy in trans men. Female-to-male transsexuals are a small population to begin with, and many undergo hysterectomy/oophorectomy early on in their hormonal treatment, thus making the study of long-term testosterone effects on the uterus and ovaries difficult. Also, some trans men may have suffered from PCOS before beginning testosterone treatment, making it difficult to know if PCOS-like symptoms may have originated before of after T therapy.

    Because the relationship between long-term androgen use and gynecological health is not yet fully understood, and because many trans men often experience embarrassment and/or access issues over obtaining ongoing gynecological care, some may feel it is appropriate to pursue such surgeries as a preventative measure. Always discuss the latest medical research and the pros and cons of these procedures with your doctor.

    If a trans man chooses not to have a hysto/oopho procedure, he should continue to have regular Pap smears (to screen for cervical cancer) and should seek out the care of a doctor if he experiences any irregular vaginal bleeding (including spotting), cramping, or pain. It is not uncommon for trans men who are pre-hysterectomy to experience a buildup of endometrial tissue, especially during the first few years of testosterone therapy. Endometrial tissue is normally shed during menstruation, but since this process is usually stopped a few months into testosterone therapy, additional tissue may continue to build up and may eventually begin to shed in the form of spotting. Because irregular bleeding can be a sign of cancer (though this is often not the case), trans men who experience any bleeding/spotting should see a doctor who will perform tests to determine the cause of the spotting. These tests may include an endometrial biopsy and/or an ultrasound. The doctor may advise a short course of progesterone to cause the uterus to shed the excess endometrial tissue-- this is much like inducing a period. While this may be unpleasant, it should be understood as a preventative measure, since the unusual buildup of endometrial tissue has been linked to endometrial cancer."

    http://www.ftmguide.org/tandhealth.html

    ReplyDelete
  5. "I'll never forgive you for all the people in my community (and yours) who have fallen victim to an oppressive trans narrative, and accompanying medical processes (including myself) and who will never take your warnings seriously (or even read them) because of vile way you have disowned us and turned us away, leaving us nowhere to run but to the arms of an oppressive, neo-libralist, trans paradigm constructed and run by dominant men."

    -A young Butch

    July 23, 2014 at 2:04 AM

    Young Butch, very interesting post.....I wish you well....

    ReplyDelete
  6. Young butch, your post confuses me. I've no idea what you just said and what your point is.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Big,

    Don't worry about it. It wasn't for you anyway.

    -Young Butch.

    ReplyDelete

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